freakshere:

septembriseur:

Wow, OK, I had kind of conceptualized that Joss Whedon post along the lines of “here are some random thoughts that I’m gonna store behind a cut in case a few people are interested,” not expecting so many people to reblog it. But since there was so much interest, I ended up thinking about it more. And the direction my thinking took me in was this: what is it that women find attractive in male and female characters, and to what extent does this match up with what men assume that women find attractive in these characters?

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All the this. 
What women want is subordinate to what men decide that women want, and the latter is then culturally broadcast as the ideological “what women want” that becomes accepted.”

(via lazarus-james)

— 1 day ago with 1456 notes
#what women want  #female gaze  #men's opinions  #women in comics  #female superheroes  #female characters  #black widow 
A woman wrote this. Yes I’m a woman. And I wrote this. It contains opinions.

keiren-smith:

Been asked for my opinion (in phone calls and PMs I’ve gotten) and I’ve pointed out that I’ve tried to not comment on ‘the’ cover directly (I’m sure I slipped up somewhere! Gotta be honest, I giggle so hard every time I see it that it’s hard to put a thought together). My entire point, my near-constant argument in life, is that people get to have opinions… and by people, I mean “women”.

Short version:  most women are terrified to speak out loud and express an opinion. They are utterly petrified to do so when they are addressing issues of women, sexism and feminism. The internet has emboldened women to speak out more—but it has also enabled men to easily put more effort into silencing them, or threatening them into silence. When I say “terrified” I mean TERRIFIED. All of you were able to grasp how horrible it was when Janelle Assellin wrote about the death and rape threats she gets…none of you seem to get that the constant onslaught of mockery, sneering and general disrespect is equally exhausting. (Do consider, gentlemen:  You find a woman daring to criticise a working comics pro or illustrator as “disrespectful”, appalling, etc. but you have utterly no problem with mocking her or her defenders across the internet and starting memes to continue that mocking. She’s not entitled to her opinion…so she’s entitled to YOURS telling her that.) Most women I know fear having that spill into public encounters with these men, and having to work or socialise in now-toxic environments. To that end, I have had many private talks with women genuinely upset with the online discussion about the cover, or the levels of vitriol found in the social media accounts of men, even comics pros, they admire. Thus, they are fearful to engage.

The first argument is, of course, that YOU are equally entitled to your opinion.

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— 2 days ago with 244 notes
#mana  #feminism  #nonsense  #women in comics 

"I still had no idea what I was looking at 90% of the time. When I walked into the Artist’s Alley, I was shocked to find that I had apparently missed several popular titles in my quest to know all of anime and manga—most notably, that “swimming anime” is apparently old hat, to be replaced by “biking anime” (Yowamushi Pedal), which was the subject of much erotic fanart in the Alley.
This removal from the culture, this divorce from fandom, pushed me into a place where I felt I was having a kind of out-of-body experience in regards to attending a con. There were no panels I wanted to see, no guests I wanted to meet, not really even anything I wanted to buy, save a gigantic Alpaca plushie that my incredibly kind partner purchased for me (see image for scale/supreme cuteness). I was wandering the halls of a convention center as a pure observer and I realized that, overall, conventions are goddamned weird.”
—Ivy Noelle Weir: “Con Diaries: Ivy Goes to Otakon & Watches All The Anime Pt 2: I’m in Hell, This is Hell”

"I still had no idea what I was looking at 90% of the time. When I walked into the Artist’s Alley, I was shocked to find that I had apparently missed several popular titles in my quest to know all of anime and manga—most notably, that “swimming anime” is apparently old hat, to be replaced by “biking anime” (Yowamushi Pedal), which was the subject of much erotic fanart in the Alley.

This removal from the culture, this divorce from fandom, pushed me into a place where I felt I was having a kind of out-of-body experience in regards to attending a con. There were no panels I wanted to see, no guests I wanted to meet, not really even anything I wanted to buy, save a gigantic Alpaca plushie that my incredibly kind partner purchased for me (see image for scale/supreme cuteness). I was wandering the halls of a convention center as a pure observer and I realized that, overall, conventions are goddamned weird.”

—Ivy Noelle Weir: “Con Diaries: Ivy Goes to Otakon & Watches All The Anime Pt 2: I’m in Hell, This is Hell

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#anime  #conventions  #otakon  #yowamushi pedal 

Together, X-23 and Angel have a Beauty and the Beast, or at least Emilio Estevez and Ally Sheedy in The Breakfast Club kind of chemistry–and yes, Warren considers himself “Beauty.” The new relationship has my attention, and it already feels more plausible than the Cyclops/X-23 red herring. All-New X-Men still hasn’t reallydone much with either Warren or Laura, so it’s some much needed attention for the both of them.  It also raises the stakes for when—if–the original X-Men go back to the past, because that will mean the end of any new relationships they form in the present. (In this case, he’d be going back to a time before X-23 was probably even born.)”

—Kayleigh Hearn, “Review: All-New X-Men #30

— 1 week ago with 10 notes
#all new xmen  #angel  #warren worthington  #x23  #laura kinney  #xmen  #comics  #review