Women Write About Comics


Q: With work like Three, and Über, and Phonogram: Rue Britannia as well, there also seems to be what I think of as a crisis of national identity in your work. And I hesitate to say that, because it tends to be used by people who write books about “what is Britain?” but they do all tie in.

Kieron Gillen: Rue Britannia is sort of who gets to tell the story of what Britpop is, and that’s what [David] Kohl’s crisis is. And if you go to my two dual pieces on Britain and official identity, which are Manchester Gods in Journey into Mystery and the Sinister stuff in Uncanny X-Men, they were deliberately conceived as almost anti-Britain–I think any British leftist has to be anti-Britain, because of our imperialistic nature, but Manchester Gods pretty much argued that the “hey nonny nonny” and the field and the green and the elves and the pixies is bullshit. The only thing of interest that’s ever happened in Britain, that’s ever been important about Britain, is the Industrial Revolution. And that is so much more important. Britain needs to be industrially progressive–I don’t want to say “progressive,” that’s a loaded word, but you know what I mean?
At the same time, the class structure and the utter arrogance was all there in Sinister; Sinister is the bad side of Britain, everything I hate about it. I mean, a lot of leftists, especially in the last fifty years, have been kind of anti-constant progress, partially in response to nuclear war and the failure of the Soviet Union. But as a working-class guy, I’d be dead, you know? I’d be dead at twenty-five if it wasn’t for science, because of my appendix, or I’d just be down a fucking mine, or whatever.
—Kelly Kanayama’s London Super Comic Con interview with Kieron Gillen
Q: With work like Three, and Über, and Phonogram: Rue Britannia as well, there also seems to be what I think of as a crisis of national identity in your work. And I hesitate to say that, because it tends to be used by people who write books about “what is Britain?” but they do all tie in.

Kieron Gillen: Rue Britannia is sort of who gets to tell the story of what Britpop is, and that’s what [David] Kohl’s crisis is. And if you go to my two dual pieces on Britain and official identity, which are Manchester Gods in Journey into Mystery and the Sinister stuff in Uncanny X-Men, they were deliberately conceived as almost anti-Britain–I think any British leftist has to be anti-Britain, because of our imperialistic nature, but Manchester Gods pretty much argued that the “hey nonny nonny” and the field and the green and the elves and the pixies is bullshit. The only thing of interest that’s ever happened in Britain, that’s ever been important about Britain, is the Industrial Revolution. And that is so much more important. Britain needs to be industrially progressive–I don’t want to say “progressive,” that’s a loaded word, but you know what I mean?

At the same time, the class structure and the utter arrogance was all there in Sinister; Sinister is the bad side of Britain, everything I hate about it. I mean, a lot of leftists, especially in the last fifty years, have been kind of anti-constant progress, partially in response to nuclear war and the failure of the Soviet Union. But as a working-class guy, I’d be dead, you know? I’d be dead at twenty-five if it wasn’t for science, because of my appendix, or I’d just be down a fucking mine, or whatever.

—Kelly Kanayama’s London Super Comic Con interview with Kieron Gillen

— 1 day ago with 4 notes
#kieron gillen  #comics  #phonogram  #uber  #xmen 
elizabreitweiser:

Hello! I’m finally ready to share some exciting news with all 5 of you who follow my career (hey, mom!). I have partnered up with writer Robert Kirkman (creator of The Walking Dead) and illustrator Paul Azaceta as the colorist of their new horror series, Outcast. Here’s our cover for #1. Be sure to keep an eye out for it this June! The first issue will be a whopping double-sized 44 pages for the regular price of $2.99. Can’t beat that.

Watch that name!

elizabreitweiser:

Hello! I’m finally ready to share some exciting news with all 5 of you who follow my career (hey, mom!). I have partnered up with writer Robert Kirkman (creator of The Walking Dead) and illustrator Paul Azaceta as the colorist of their new horror series, Outcast. Here’s our cover for #1. Be sure to keep an eye out for it this June! The first issue will be a whopping double-sized 44 pages for the regular price of $2.99. Can’t beat that.

Watch that name!

— 1 day ago with 208 notes
#colourists  #art  #eliza breitweiser 
Comic Resources Masterpost

baiku:

fyeahfemmes:

Since the miniseries starts on Wednesday I decided to put all the info and links we’ve been posting in one masterpost so first off

Places to Buy It
~This is a link to find safe and friendly comic shops

~Comixology is the go to place for digital comics (I use it and vouch by it)

~Comixology also has an itunes app if you want digital comics and don’t have a credit card (since pretty much every chain store has itunes gift cards)

~Midtown Comics ships (I’d say it might be worth getting few more titles to justify shipping costs though, feel free to ask me for recommendations)

Other Info

~Windblade 1 comes out April 16th and has Chromia and Windblade

~Robots in Disguise 28 (start of a new storyline and suitable to start with) comes out April 23 and has Arcee and Marissa Faireborn

~More Than Meets the Eye 27 (start of a new storyline and suitable to start with) comes out April 30 and has Nautica

Archonia takes PayPal and ships internationally, located in Europe so might be best pick for European fans.

TFAW is also an alternate, located in USA. They don’t take PayPal but I think their shipping might be lower than Midtowncomics?

Lady-robot fan? Lapsed Transformers fan looking to get back into rodo-disguise? There you go

(via fyeahfemmes)

— 1 day ago with 17 notes
#windblade  #transformers  #robots in disguise  #lady robots  #girl robots  #female transformers 
Let's talk about how some men talk to women in comics →

gimpnelly:

Last week I wrote this piece for Comic Book Resources about the new Teen Titans #1 cover. The point of the piece was hey, there’s a broad demographic DC *could* be hitting with this book but the cover is certainly not made for that potential demographic. Instead, it’s more of the same-old,…

— 1 day ago with 5200 notes
#misogyny  #sexism in comics  #comics fandom  #sexual harrassment 

“The Riverdale books have long had a loose sense of continuity. It’s obvious that not even Veronica Lodge herself can be on tour in Mumbai, interning at a fashion mag in Paris, and bickering in the mall with Betty. But over the past few years, the company has made great efforts to modernize the brand and, in their estimation, risks had to be taken and the nostalgia-driven un-time of Riverdale had to be unfrozen to stay relevant to LWA‘s adult, adolescent, and kid audiences. In 2010 they shook longtime Archie readers with duelling wedding stories—Archie would grow up and marry Veronica! Or was that Betty? (Maybe both?) And three years later, the company introduced Riverdale’s first gay character, Kevin Keller, and gave him his own book. (Even Kevin got in on the future-wedding action, marrying a fellow soldier he met at a VA hospital.) Other experiments included breaking with tradition by running covers outside the house style (they did manga covers, photo realistic covers, and punk covers), doing TV crossovers, and bringing on big names to write mini-series without oppressive editorial oversight.
A line was drawn between the Riverdale of then, and the Riverdale of now. The Riverdale of now was just as wholesome, but it was a contemporary, fairly progressive, and flexible kind of wholesome. The company today has a clear sense of purpose and identity.”
—Megan Purdy, "Archie Will Die: What Does it Mean?"

The Riverdale books have long had a loose sense of continuity. It’s obvious that not even Veronica Lodge herself can be on tour in Mumbai, interning at a fashion mag in Paris, and bickering in the mall with Betty. But over the past few years, the company has made great efforts to modernize the brand and, in their estimation, risks had to be taken and the nostalgia-driven un-time of Riverdale had to be unfrozen to stay relevant to LWA‘s adult, adolescent, and kid audiences. In 2010 they shook longtime Archie readers with duelling wedding stories—Archie would grow up and marry Veronica! Or was that Betty? (Maybe both?) And three years later, the company introduced Riverdale’s first gay character, Kevin Keller, and gave him his own book. (Even Kevin got in on the future-wedding action, marrying a fellow soldier he met at a VA hospital.) Other experiments included breaking with tradition by running covers outside the house style (they did manga covers, photo realistic covers, and punk covers), doing TV crossovers, and bringing on big names to write mini-series without oppressive editorial oversight.

A line was drawn between the Riverdale of then, and the Riverdale of now. The Riverdale of now was just as wholesome, but it was a contemporary, fairly progressive, and flexible kind of wholesome. The company today has a clear sense of purpose and identity.”

—Megan Purdy, "Archie Will Die: What Does it Mean?"

— 1 day ago
#archie comics  #betty and veronica  #archie andrews  #veronica lodge  #betty cooper 

“The 300 film series deals with Spartan life by eliding those cultural differences that might put off its target, white, straight, cis, American male audience, such as the separation of men and women (and baby murder), and emphasizing those aspects which Frank Miller and Zack Snyder think could be points of connection. Sparta is recast as a beacon of freedom, pressed on all sides by forces of assimilating liberals (Athenians) and ignorant savages (Persians). Spartans represent a kind of pure, unsullied masculinity–men at their best, who want only to fight side by side with their fellows; to die for each other, and for their honour. In 300, Athenians are confused, ill-trained man-children who must be guided into true manhood by the three hundred Spartans who would die at Thermopylae and thus inspire them. Rise of An Empire must of course deal with Athenians a little differently, as it’s in this film that Athenians finally get to tell their side of the story.
Themistocles, like Leonides before him, represents the best of Athenian life. He is a naval commander who won glory and position by storming a previous Persian expeditionary force and expelling them, and by killing King Darius through a literal long shot, from shore to ship. He lives in a humble home, apparently unmarried, makes speeches about the importance of friendship, freedom, and his dream of a “united Greece.” He fights as a hoplite–ground infantry–as cavalry, and as a commander on the sea. He’s also a politician. He speaks in the forum and travels Greece to use that famous Athenian rhetoric to speak with leaders of other city states. (Too bad all the rhetoric is god awful.) He does it all, and he does it with homespun grace. Leonides was, metaphorically, an American warrior, but Themistocles is an American soldier by day, All-American boy by night.”
—Megan Purdy, "Freedom! Masculinity! Anxiety! 300:: Rise of an Empire is Unsurprisingly Dick-Centric and Decidedly American”

The 300 film series deals with Spartan life by eliding those cultural differences that might put off its target, white, straight, cis, American male audience, such as the separation of men and women (and baby murder), and emphasizing those aspects which Frank Miller and Zack Snyder think could be points of connection. Sparta is recast as a beacon of freedom, pressed on all sides by forces of assimilating liberals (Athenians) and ignorant savages (Persians). Spartans represent a kind of pure, unsullied masculinity–men at their best, who want only to fight side by side with their fellows; to die for each other, and for their honour. In 300, Athenians are confused, ill-trained man-children who must be guided into true manhood by the three hundred Spartans who would die at Thermopylae and thus inspire them. Rise of An Empire must of course deal with Athenians a little differently, as it’s in this film that Athenians finally get to tell their side of the story.

Themistocles, like Leonides before him, represents the best of Athenian life. He is a naval commander who won glory and position by storming a previous Persian expeditionary force and expelling them, and by killing King Darius through a literal long shot, from shore to ship. He lives in a humble home, apparently unmarried, makes speeches about the importance of friendship, freedom, and his dream of a “united Greece.” He fights as a hoplite–ground infantry–as cavalry, and as a commander on the sea. He’s also a politician. He speaks in the forum and travels Greece to use that famous Athenian rhetoric to speak with leaders of other city states. (Too bad all the rhetoric is god awful.) He does it all, and he does it with homespun grace. Leonides was, metaphorically, an American warrior, but Themistocles is an American soldier by day, All-American boy by night.”

—Megan Purdy, "Freedom! Masculinity! Anxiety! 300:: Rise of an Empire is Unsurprisingly Dick-Centric and Decidedly American”

— 1 day ago with 5 notes
#300  #300: rise of an empire  #eva green  #movies  #reviews 
Batwomen75: Call for Essays!
Last year we honoured Lois Lane’s 75th birthday with a series of essays from our staff and some awesome guests.
This year, we’re honouring the girls and women of the Batbooks! (Don’t worry, Catwoman will get her own 75th birthday party next year.) Are you a Batfan? A women-of-the-Batbooks fan? Do you have a great idea for an essay? Pitch us!
We’re looking for historical character profiles, thematic, comparative, or critical essays, relationship spotlights, and other amazing things I haven’t listed here.
Pitch us at WWAC.

Batwomen75: Call for Essays!

Last year we honoured Lois Lane’s 75th birthday with a series of essays from our staff and some awesome guests.

This year, we’re honouring the girls and women of the Batbooks! (Don’t worry, Catwoman will get her own 75th birthday party next year.) Are you a Batfan? A women-of-the-Batbooks fan? Do you have a great idea for an essay? Pitch us!

We’re looking for historical character profiles, thematic, comparative, or critical essays, relationship spotlights, and other amazing things I haven’t listed here.

Pitch us at WWAC.

— 1 day ago with 4 notes
#batman  #batwoman  #huntress  #catwoman  #batgirl 

gentlemantiger:

wornoldhat:

It’s very hard for me to be silly about Superman, because I’ve seen firsthand how he actually transforms people’s lives. I have seen children dying of brain tumors who wanted as their last request to talk to me, and have gone to their graves with a peace brought on by knowing that their belief in this kind of character really matters. It’s not Superman the tongue-in-cheek cartoon character they’re connecting with; they’re connecting with something very basic: the ability to overcome obstacles, the ability to persevere, the ability to understand difficulty and to turn your back on it. [Christopher Reeve] – Time, (March 14, 1988)

I think this post may have changed my mind about Superman.

I love Superman, and nobody is going to change my mind about that.

(Source: reyesrobbies)

— 1 day ago with 7008 notes
#superman  #death  #bravery  #stories 
Webcomics Capsules: superheroes and feminists →

"Webcomics Capsules is all about short webcomics reviews—more like recommendations, actually. See what our writers are enjoying around the web, choose your favorites and get to reading! This edition has two of my favorite things: superheroes and feminism."

(Source: addtoany.com)

— 2 days ago with 5 notes
#webcomics  #review  #comics 

I like the tutorial process employed; simple instructions that pop up to provide the necessary information, without handholding. Lara can light fires to free herself, reveal access ways, and otherwise affect the environment in order to achieve a particular goal. “Survival Instinct” is apparently a new feature to the Tomb Raider games. It offers a muted screen, with certain elements highlighted, such as enemies, animals, and items that can be interacted with, as well as showing which direction Lara needs to go. It’s similar to Batman’s “Detective Mode” in the Arkham series of games, although this feels a bit like cheating, since, unlike Batman, Lara herself doesn’t have any gadgets to actually allow her to access this mode. Technically, I could avoid using Survival Instinct if I wanted more immersive game play, but I’m not that hardcore. Plus I’d spend a lot of time running in circles if I didn’t have something to point me in the right direction (and even then, I remain orientationally challenged. HINT: Don’t follow me).
Early on, I encountered my first puzzle. Survival Instinct did come in handy to reveal the items for interaction, but I appreciated that the player still has to use their head to figure out exactly what to do to remove the obstacles.
“You can do this,” is Lara’s mantra as she presses on through a frightening scenario that culminates in a seeming attack from a man whom I believe was saying he was trying to help her. But, understandably, Lara’s reaction to being grabbed at inside a cave full of apparent human sacrifices is to escape, bringing down big chunks of the cave along the way.
—Wendy Browne, "Tomb Raider Gaming Journal 1: In the beginning…"

I like the tutorial process employed; simple instructions that pop up to provide the necessary information, without handholding. Lara can light fires to free herself, reveal access ways, and otherwise affect the environment in order to achieve a particular goal. “Survival Instinct” is apparently a new feature to the Tomb Raider games. It offers a muted screen, with certain elements highlighted, such as enemies, animals, and items that can be interacted with, as well as showing which direction Lara needs to go. It’s similar to Batman’s “Detective Mode” in the Arkham series of games, although this feels a bit like cheating, since, unlike Batman, Lara herself doesn’t have any gadgets to actually allow her to access this mode. Technically, I could avoid using Survival Instinct if I wanted more immersive game play, but I’m not that hardcore. Plus I’d spend a lot of time running in circles if I didn’t have something to point me in the right direction (and even then, I remain orientationally challenged. HINT: Don’t follow me).

Early on, I encountered my first puzzle. Survival Instinct did come in handy to reveal the items for interaction, but I appreciated that the player still has to use their head to figure out exactly what to do to remove the obstacles.

“You can do this,” is Lara’s mantra as she presses on through a frightening scenario that culminates in a seeming attack from a man whom I believe was saying he was trying to help her. But, understandably, Lara’s reaction to being grabbed at inside a cave full of apparent human sacrifices is to escape, bringing down big chunks of the cave along the way.

—Wendy Browne, "Tomb Raider Gaming Journal 1: In the beginning…"

— 5 days ago with 5 notes
#tomb raider  #lara croft  #video games