Kids Read Comics: One cool little convention

— 9 hours ago with 1 note
#kids read comics  #scratch 9  #t-rex 
Watch Barbarella with the WWAC Classic Nerd Movie Club at 8 pm EST tonight and join our livetweet with hashtag #WWACNerdMovie. Barbarella is available on both Netflix and Amazon Prime.

Watch Barbarella with the WWAC Classic Nerd Movie Club at 8 pm EST tonight and join our livetweet with hashtag #WWACNerdMovie. Barbarella is available on both Netflix and Amazon Prime.

— 1 day ago with 3 notes
#WWACNerdMovie  #Barbarella 

"It's hard to be an up & coming female rapper nowadays because people don't know what to do with us. Like, they don't know what to do with women in Hip-Hop, so the best thing to do is to pit them against each other and it's like, 'You are gonna be better than her because she's the only one doing it right now,' and there are so many male rappers now that no one says that about." (x)

(Source: noirmani, via zezlemet)

— 1 day ago with 15752 notes
#community  #feminism 
The Name Game

fuckyeahblackwidow:

One of the most frequently asked of frequently asked questions is how Natasha’s name works. Is it Natasha or Natalia? Romanoff or Romanova? Which is her real name?

The tricky bit is this: Natalia and Natasha are both forms of the Russian name Наталья. The Natalia/Natasha equivalency doesn’t exist in English, leading to tail-chasing confusion about which is real and which is fake. Natasha is a diminutive form of Natalia, the same way Bill is a nickname for William. “Natalia” is not more authentic or more Russian, it’s just more formal. “Natasha Romanoff” is not an alias the way “Nadine Roman” or “Nancy Rushman” are.

The Romanoff/Romanova issue is just a question of transliteration. The Russian surname is Рома́нов, which has been written Romanoff or Romanov depending on the decade. In Russian, women’s last names take feminine endings to match their grammatical gender— Ivan Belov becomes Yelena Belova, Aleksandr Belinsky becomes Aleksandra Belinskaya. But the feminine endings often get dropped in English translation, e.g. Nastia Liukin, and not Nastia Liukina.

I want to make it out that there isn’t really a standard, “correct” way to translate a Russian name into English. Sometimes the patronymic is dropped, sometimes it isn’t. Immigrant women use the feminine form, or they don’t. It’s a matter of preference, and can also be generational.

I also want to emphasize that comics have never been able to make up their mind.

Read More

(via carolinamello)

— 1 day ago with 1279 notes
#black widow  #marvel comics